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July 12, 2012

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CSRAinc

Chris, I spend a LOT of time online, in good company, too, so I experience a lot of blog posts. This one is out of the park exceptional. Thank you.

It's brilliant because it drives home the idea in a context that everyone can understand. The whimsy is delectable.

As my firm's focus is social business strategy for risk averse organizations, I want to connect your message more strongly to your mention of "social networks."

I have written extensively about how enterprise executives can produce much more value by thinking in small numbers. In other words, from a social business perspective, the firm has to be very clear of whom it wants to come to its funeral. To earn that, it has to interact with them consistently, and above expectation. There's no magic. It takes commitment, focus and care. That said, it's very difficult for executives to accept the small numbers part. As I wrote in Networks vs Mass Communications [http://bit.ly/netvmass], only by appealing in an extraordinary way (focus) will firms (i.e. FSIs) earn access to their readers'/followers'/etc. networks.

The mass marketing era is largely over with its formula of dishing out "content" like smiley pictures on home pages and frankenfeelings on social media to general audiences. Most FSIs and brands haven't gotten the memo, so they don't earn "engagement." At this rate, they'll have to hire their pallbearers.

I will refer people to your post repeatedly because it communicates the ethos in a delightful, viseral way. Thanks again!

M Baume

This is indeed a great piece and is very much on the money ( or rather lack of it as is the case today, and seems set to be more so tomorrow etc). You mean I have to justify my bonus to the shareholders???

Social interaction (it used to be called social intercourse) has however been transformed as the world of technology creates virtual communities who prefer to meet in cyber space. The phenomenons of Facebook, Twitter, You Tube etc suggest that community is being redefined in a virtual way, but may not provide for appropriate social interaction. This reinforces isolationism and is not a development likely to support your theory.

Already concerns exist over how to create better connections and of course in financial services there is a ready made solution - yes - it is The Financial Services Club, a place where real people meet to discuss real life solutions - it seems you got there first!!!

Nice one Chris and keep up the thinking and community spirit, we need it!

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